Tag Archives: animals

Meat, Climate Change and the Bible

by Vincent Mossberg.

In 2013, an IPCC (Intergovernmental panel on climate change) report was published stating that 95 percent of scientists are positive that the climate crisis of today is caused by mankind. Over the past 40 years, greenhouse gas emissions due to human activity have increased by 70 percent. During the same time, global meat consumption has tripled.

The connection between meat consumption and greenhouse gas emissions received increased attention in 2013, when the UN’s Organisation for Food and Agriculture released a report stating that around 18 precent of greenhouse gas emissions today comes from animal agriculture. And even if there would be zero emissions from all sectors such as energy, transport and trade, but not from animal agriculture, this would still not be enough to keep the planet from overheating. The issue of meat production and ultimately meat consumption is one of the biggest environmental issues of our time.

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So what is the church’s role in reducing the global meat production in order to steward the planet and the animals that inhabit it? Continue reading Meat, Climate Change and the Bible

Didn’t God Give Us Animals to Use?

by Sarah Withrow King

In an excellent book called A Faith Embracing All Creatures, edited by Tripp York and Andy Alexis-Baker, CreatureKind’s David Clough takes up the question “What’s the Point of Animals?” I think the question we are wrestling with today: “Didn’t God give us animals to use?” is a similar one. Both questions force us to deal with the “why” of animals and then the “why” of our own actions towards them.

Continue reading Didn’t God Give Us Animals to Use?

A Case for Pentecostal Veganism

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by Pastor Eric Gabourel

“I don’t eat the flesh of animals, their by causing them pain…” wrote the man that was to become the first General Overseer of the Church of God (Cleveland, TN). A.J. Tomlinson’s story of facilitating the growth of an international Pentecostal denomination begins in the lonely hamlet of Culbertson, North Carolina.

Tomlinson, a native of Indiana, was no stranger to this part of the American South. He had been on missionary journeys to rural Appalachia before. Armed with the disciplines of fasting and prayer this journey was to be one that would make a lasting impact on 20th century Christianity.

Tomlinson moved to Culbertson, N.C. on October 16, 1899 with an Edenic vision in his heart. Tomlinson referred to himself and his cohorts as Bible Missionaries Living in Common. Their goal was not only to recreate the egalitarian vision of the early church, but to also restore a reality experienced in the Garden of Eden.

Continue reading A Case for Pentecostal Veganism