All posts by Micael Grenholm

Pastor, author and charismactivist residing in Uppsala, Sweden. Editor for Hela Pingsten and pcpj.org. Love revival, peace, justice and evangelism.

These Stats Show Why White Evangelicals Support Trump – While Black Evangelicals Don’t

People often ask me: “Why do so many evangelical Christians support Trump?” . It’s a good question. What is with having a high view of Scripture that leads people to celebrate someone who in so many ways doesn’t sound and act like Jesus?

What many people tend to forget is that while 70-80 percent of white evangelicals support Trump, only 20 percent of black evangelicals – that is, African Americans with evangelical beliefs – do the same.

The difference between these groups is not their view of Scripture: they all see it as the authoritative Word of God. Something else is going on here. Let’s look at some statistics to find out!

This survey was conducted after the 2016 election and shows that for black evangelicals, helping the needy is one of the most important election issues – but one of the least important for white evangelicals. White evangelicals were very interested in the immigration issue (in the sense of not receiving refugees, more on that below) and national security, something black evangelicals did not find as important.

Abortion played a surprisingly small role – only 7 % of white evangelicals viewed it as the most important issue, and black evangelicals did not prioritize it at all even though most of them are pro-life.

A survey from this year shows that evangelicals vote in favor of people who are equal to themselves to a greater extent than the rest of the population, while they vote in favor of the most vulnerable to a lesser extent. This may explain why white evangelicals are not more outraged that Trump cuts food stamps and why most of them believe that immigrant children from Latin America should be separated from their parents.

The United States is the richest country in the world. Despite this, two-thirds of white evangelicals believe that the US has no responsibility to receive refugees at all. Thus, they don’t have much of a problem with the fact that the US has received record low levels of refugees during the Trump administration. Black Christians, on the other hand, are more welcoming to refugees than the American population as a whole.

We can also see that an increased negative attitude towards blacks correlates with supporting Trump, and that a majority of white evangelicals see a reduced white population as something negative. Black evangelicals clearly think differently about this. For them, it is outrageous that Trump has been slow to condemn white supremacy or that he lied about almost all murders being committed by blacks. White evangelicals simply don’t seem to care as much.

These numbers are the most chocking of all, in my opinion. While many evangelicals say that they support Trump despite his moral shortcomings, there are millions of white evangelicals who say that he is actually morally upstanding. Even more – 57 % – say that he is honest.

Black evangelicals, on the other hand, do not perceive Trump as a moral role model. Interestingly, both white and black Christians agree that Trump is self-centered. Apparently, that’s not a serious moral flaw to many white evangelicals.

I find these stats to be devastating. This isn’t merely about what party to pick on election day – this is about our discipleship. I can understand someone valuing pro-life policy to the extent that they are willing to bite the bullet and legitimize a presidential candidate they have a lot of problems with for the sake of the unborn.

But these surveys paint a different picture. Many white evangelicals don’t vote for Trump despite his flaws – but because of them. Many of them don’t value the lives of the poor and vulnerable as much as black Christians do.

It hasn’t always been like this. Take Pentecostals (who are usually labelled evangelicals in these polls): they were originally united, regardless of race, in valuing selflessness, justice and equality. Movements like Black Lives Matter and Fridays for Future show us that the world is desperate for such an ethic today.

What would happen if white evangelicals started to share the values and priorities of their black brothers and sisters?

Update: Here’s a great, short video that looks at the history of white and black Christian voting patterns:

Micael Grenholm is a Swedish pastor, author and editor for PCPJ.

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Pentecostals & Charismatics for Peace & Justice is a multicultural, gender inclusive, and ecumenical organization that promotes peace, justice, and reconciliation work among Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians around the world. If you like what we do, please become a member!

6,000 Children Die of Hunger Caused by Corona – Every Day

About 6,000 children will die today due to food shortages caused by the pandemic.

They do not die from the virus. They die of starvation and malnutrition.

Just as many will die tomorrow. And as many the day after that.

The UN warned this spring that corona would cause a famine of biblical proportions. Now it’s here.

The number of people affected by food insecurity has risen by 120 million due to the pandemic and its economic effects.

That is why I am so happy that the World Food Programme (WFP) receives the Nobel Peace Prize this year. While the streak of Pentecostal Nobel peace prize winners is over, I couldn’t be happier of the choice of the Nobel committee. 

The media does not seem to think it is as exciting and controversial as if Donald “Fire and Fury” Trump had received it. But WFP is needed more than ever.

They do an incredibly good job of identifying hunger crises before they break out and fighting for as many as possible to survive.
The problem is that, like most UN programs, they are underfunded.

Feel free to give a gift to WFP here! you can also download the Share the meal app and get reminded every day as you eat your lunch that a child somewhere else can enjoy the same for less than a dollar.

Micael Grenholm is a Swedish pastor, author and editor for PCPJ.

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Pentecostals & Charismatics for Peace & Justice is a multicultural, gender inclusive, and ecumenical organization that promotes peace, justice, and reconciliation work among Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians around the world. If you like what we do, please become a member!

Why Pentecostal Churches Managed to Fight COVID-19 Better than the United Nations

Why are many American Pentecostals disobedient regarding efforts to stop the spread of COVID-19? Are Pentecostals and Charismatics in other parts of the world behaving differently? How was the strong faith in healing that characterized early Pentecostals impacted by the pandemic known as the “Spanish Flu”?

A few weeks ago, PCPJ gathered a panel of scholars and Pentecostal leaders to discuss these important questions. The panel consisted of:

Jörg Haustein, doctor of World Christianities, University of Cambridge.
Erica Ramirez, president of PCPJ, director of applied research, Auburn Seminary.
Daniel Isgrigg, director for the Holy Spirit Research Center, Oral Roberts University.
Niclas Lindgren, director, PMU Interlife.
Andrea Johnson, Assistant Professor of History, California State University DH.
Micael Grenholm, pastor, editor at PCPJ.

Everybody brought interesting food for thought to the table. Isgrigg compared Pentecostal reactions to the Spanish Flu with what we see today. Ramirez spoke about what aspects of the Pentecostal faith makes it vulnerable to conspiracy theories. Haustein pointed to the nuance between different Pentecostal and Charismatic groups even in the same country. Johnson gave a historical backdrop to how American Pentecostals view politics.

Continue reading Why Pentecostal Churches Managed to Fight COVID-19 Better than the United Nations

Evangelical Hypocrisy extends far beyond Jerry Falwell Jr.

I’m sad to say that I wasn’t surprised when I saw that Jerry Falwell Jr. resigns as the president of Liberty University after posting a sexual photo from his yacht on social media and allegedly having approved of an extramarital affair between his wife and a business partner (including watching from a corner while they were having sex).

The allegations concerning the bizarre sex games are disputed, but the photo alone gave Liberty University enough reason to question Falwell’s leadership, as the evangelical university has some very strict guidelines concerning sexuality, dress code and alcohol consumption (Falwell is holding a drink in the photo, writing in the caption “I promise it’s just black water in my glass”).

If a student at Liberty University had posted the same photo, the consequences would likely have been more than $9,000 in school fines and 900 hours of required service, and possible expulsion.

There’s one word that people keeps coming back to when describing this situation: hypocrisy. The very thing that Jesus warned his disciples against over and over again. “Be on your guard against the yeast of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy”, the Lord said. “There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known.” (Luke 12:1-2). Continue reading Evangelical Hypocrisy extends far beyond Jerry Falwell Jr.

Politicians Conflating the Kingdom of God with America

Tiffany Trump said at the 2020 Republican National Convention:

“God has blessed us with unstoppable spirit. His spirit, the American spirit. My dad has proven to be driven by that spirit.”

Vice President Mike Pence paraphrased Hebrews 12:1-2 but replaced ”Jesus” with the American flag and Christians with Americans:

“So let’s run the race marked out for us. Let’s fix our eyes on Old Glory and all she represents. Let’s fix our eyes on this land of heroes and let their courage inspire.”

Just one year ago, President Trump called himself “The Chosen One”, and thanked someone for ”the very nice words” of calling him the “king of Israel” and like ”the second coming of God”.

If this isn’t blasphemy… what is it?

I’m reminded of Shane Claiborne writing in his excellent book ”The Irresistible Revolution” about when some kids insisted that he should play Jesus in a church play when he did missionary work in a Latin American country.

”Why don’t any of you play Jesus?” he asked.

”You must do it!” the children said, ”because you’re white and come from America!”

Continue reading Politicians Conflating the Kingdom of God with America

Trump Promotes Pentecostal Doctor Who Warns for Alien DNA, Demon Sex and Reptilian Politicians

Now, there’s a headline you don’t get to write every single day. Nor do you often get to see this trending on Twitter:

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2020 continues to deliver when it comes to weirdness. So does President Donald Trump.

Here’s the story in a nutshell. Donald Trump’s son, aptly named Donald Trump Jr., recently labeled a video with Houston doctor Stella Immanuel a “must watch” since she promotes the drug hydroxychloroquine and says that face masks are unnecessary.

These opinions are in line with things that President Trump has said, even though most other physicians disagree. The president retweeted the video, apparently thinking that this would give medical credence to his corona policies. Madonna has also shared the video, calling Stella Immanuel her “hero”. Continue reading Trump Promotes Pentecostal Doctor Who Warns for Alien DNA, Demon Sex and Reptilian Politicians

Why Not Say “Justice” Instead of “Social Justice”?

Whenever I mention the term “social justice”, many American Christians freak out. They desperately do not want me or anyone else to use that word, as if it had the power to summon a dark lord or something.

Even when they agree with me that the content of what “social justice” typically signifies (economic equality, no oppression, no racism, etc.) is important, they don’t want me to call it social justice. If I should call it anything, it should be just “justice”. Period.

It goes to show how focused our social media culture is on the words we use, rather than the lives we live.

The reason for this censorship is that, apparently, “social justice is socialism in disguise”, “when you put ‘social’ in front of justice, you have an agenda”, “social justice has been hijacked by leftists”, and so on and so forth.

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These claims are always stated without any form of reference or source. Because they are not true.

Evangelical leaders like Billy Graham, John Stott and John Wimber all used the term social justice and deemed it to be central to Christian living. The Lausanne Movement, that helps thousands of evangelicals coordinate for global mission, has tonnes of resources regarding social justice. Continue reading Why Not Say “Justice” Instead of “Social Justice”?

God’s Love Doesn’t Stop at the Border

Our friend Shane Claiborne recently remarked on Twitter:

I can’t imagine Jesus waving an American flag any more than I can imagine him wearing a “God bless Rome” shirt.

Patriotism is too small.

Our Bible doesn’t say “For God so loved America”… it says “For God so loved the world.”

America First is a theological heresy.

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Nope. Doesn’t look right to me either.

Claiborne continued:

Mother Teresa used to say that “the circle we put around our family is too small.”

We limit who we love to biology or nationality.

That’s the problem with patriotism – it’s too small. We are to love as big as God loves.

And God’s love doesn’t stop at the border.

Cover photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash.

Three Biblical Methods for Handling Conflict

We are called by Jesus to be peacemakers (Matthew 5:9), resolving conflicts as we go forth to spread the Gospel about his love. Peace is always dependent on at least two parties, which is why we might experience conflict even when our intention is peace.

This is why Paul writes “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone” (Rom 12:18). We try our best on our part, and pray that the other respond constructively.

What does this look like in practice? God seems to be very concerned with us asking that question, since the Bible provides us with several practical tools for conflict resolution and peacemaking.

1. Breaking the cycle of hostility

The first tool is given to us by Paul right after he says that we should seek to live at peace with everyone. He continues: Continue reading Three Biblical Methods for Handling Conflict

Black Lives Must Matter: A Historical Pentecostal Response

by U-Wen Low, originally published here, reposted with permission.

Many Pentecostal Christians have been divided in how to respond to recent events. The rallying cry for most (as it has been for years) is “Black Lives Matter,” a statement which shocks us with its brazenness; it highlights the fact that African-American lives in particular are at disproportionately high risk in the United States, and has forced many of us to consider our own nations’ treatment of African-American and First Nations people.

Given the complexity of the issues, it can be extraordinarily difficult to formulate a coherent, careful response – so many of us have stayed silent.

However, it is imperative for the people of God to respond, and indeed many church organisations have already added their voices to the conversation. How, then, should Pentecostals seek to respond to these issues in a Godly way, led by the Holy Spirit?

Let us do so by reminding ourselves of the history of our movement. Like many such reflections, we begin in Acts, where the Holy Spirit falls with tongues of fire upon men and women, Jew and Gentile, causing no small amount of controversy.

The early church is prompted by the Spirit to challenge both injustice and domination; throughout the narrative of Acts, we see the early Christians (an underprivileged minority group) given agency through the Spirit, fighting persecution through acts of love and kindness – and solidarity with the poor and oppressed, to the point of martyrdom.

Of course, let us not forget that Jesus himself died alongside criminals, viewed as a criminal and disproportionately punished, murdered by an oppressive system. Continue reading Black Lives Must Matter: A Historical Pentecostal Response