Tag Archives: Quakerism

Great Podcast Episodes to Increase Your Worship and Compassion

In the 1990’s, the Vineyard movement was given the prophetic name “Worship and Compassion”, which accurately portrays the double-edged sword of the movement as it tries to find the radical middle between evangelicalism and Pentecostalism. Other Pentecostals and Charismatics can learn a lot from how Vineyarders integrate peace and justice in their charismatic life.

Our friends at Vineyard Justice Network recently promoted The Ferment Podcast in which Vineyarders as well as other Christians are asked about their thoughts on worship and transformation. I would like to highlight a few episodes of special interest to PCPJ members:

Tina Colón Williams, on being both a worship pastor and an immigration attorney.

Sam Yoder, on journeying from being old-order Amish to a worship song writer.

Carol Wimber-Wong, on the origin of the Vineyard movement and its roots in evangelical Quakerism.

See our other podcast tips here.

Micael Grenholm is editor-in-chief for PCPJ.

ska%cc%88rmavbild-2017-01-06-kl-21-17-02Pentecostals & Charismatics for Peace & Justice is a multicultural, gender inclusive, and ecumenical organization that promotes peace, justice, and reconciliation work among Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians around the world. If you like what we do, please become a member!

Quakerism as a Charismatic Tradition

by Hye Sung Francis Gehring.

What is the Charismatic Movement?

Many people make sweeping statements about the Charismatic Movement without much comprehension of the diversity among Charismatics, as evidenced by the multitude of books cautioning believers of this broad movement. In 2013, neo-reformed Baptist preacher and author John MacArthur held a conference that attracted thousands of participants that was dedicated to villifying the excesses of Pentecostals and Charismatics. This conference, “Strange Fire”, assumed Charismatics to be at least gravely deceived, if not hell-boundand blasphemers.

Thankfully, this sort of rhetoric is not as commonplace as it once was in the Church and is progressively losing its steam, as about 26% of the global Church is considered charismatic, and as different charismatic practices have been normalized and adopted by non-charismatic traditions (such as “listening prayer”, “prayer teams”, raising arms in worship, and even speaking in tongues, or the more sanitized “prayer languages”.) That said, people still have strange assumptions about what charismatic spirituality is, and many often are shocked when I claim that Quakerism is actually a thoroughly charismatic tradition.

The Charismatic Movement was initially a renewal movement across the Church rather than a distinct denominational tradition. In many ways it was influenced and informed by its predecessor, the Pentecostal Movement, but was distinct from Pentecostalism because its malleability and its desire to not start a new religious group but instead renew the participants’ respective churches in the power of the Holy Spirit. Lutherans, Methodists, Presbyterians, Catholics, and virtually every Church tradition was impacted by this movement. Continue reading Quakerism as a Charismatic Tradition